Posts tagged Architecture

Just how big is Apple’s planned Spaceship HQ in Cupertino?  Here it is in comparison to the Pentagon, Empire State Building, and various naval vessels…

Just how big is Apple’s planned Spaceship HQ in Cupertino?  Here it is in comparison to the Pentagon, Empire State Building, and various naval vessels…

Can someone please tell me what was wrong with the Georgia Dome, where the Atlanta Falcons currently play?  There is a growing body of research to show that stadium construction does little to boost the local economy, and at great expense to the tax payers…
via sbnation:

The Falcons’ insane new stadium — aka The Stankonia Dome — is actually happening.

Can someone please tell me what was wrong with the Georgia Dome, where the Atlanta Falcons currently play?  There is a growing body of research to show that stadium construction does little to boost the local economy, and at great expense to the tax payers…

via sbnation:

The Falcons’ insane new stadium — aka The Stankonia Dome — is actually happening.

Visualizing the tallest buildings in the world, circa 1896

Visualizing the tallest buildings in the world, circa 1896

Floor plan for The Office (via gregrutter)
via imwithkanye:

popculturebrain:

‘The Office’ ends its historic and influential 9-season run tonight. Keeping in this new tradition I’ve created I’m going to reblog my favorite ‘Office’ posts from over the years throughout the day.
‘The Office’, it’s going to be very hard without you.

Floor plan for The Office (via gregrutter)

via imwithkanye:

popculturebrain:

‘The Office’ ends its historic and influential 9-season run tonight. Keeping in this new tradition I’ve created I’m going to reblog my favorite ‘Office’ posts from over the years throughout the day.

‘The Office’, it’s going to be very hard without you.

Etsy Artist Recreates TV Show Apartments With Intricate Floorplans
via inakialistelizarralde:

This is a the floorplan of Lucy & Ricky Ricardo’s Apartments from the show “I LOVE LUCY(This design is based in the First Season of the series)The design is made according with the “real” apartment respecting the spaces, proportions, furniture and objets presents in the studio set.

Etsy Artist Recreates TV Show Apartments With Intricate Floorplans

via inakialistelizarralde:

This is a the floorplan of Lucy & Ricky Ricardo’s Apartments from the show “I LOVE LUCY
(This design is based in the First Season of the series)

The design is made according with the “real” apartment respecting the spaces, proportions, furniture and objets presents in the studio set.

Delta casts its shadow of reconstruction over JFK airport…
via areasofmyexpertise:

The ruin of the former Pan-Am Worldport is TOTAL MELANCHOLY. It as if it has been cared for by someone actively angry at architecture, the jet age, EVERYTHING. (at Terminal 3)

Delta casts its shadow of reconstruction over JFK airport…

via areasofmyexpertise:

The ruin of the former Pan-Am Worldport is TOTAL MELANCHOLY. It as if it has been cared for by someone actively angry at architecture, the jet age, EVERYTHING. (at Terminal 3)

via nycgov:

February 1, 2013, will be the 100th anniversary of the opening of Grand Central Terminal. To help prepare for the occasion, Metro-North electricians polished and dusted the historic melon chandeliers that illuminate the Terminal, and replaced bulbs as needed. When the chandeliers were installed a century ago, they carried bare, energy-hungry incandescent bulbs. Today they use efficient compact fluorescent bulbs that use just 5 watts to provide the same amount of light as the previous 25-watt bulbs. Each chandelier holds 110 light bulbs.
Photo Credit: MTA Flickr

via nycgov:

February 1, 2013, will be the 100th anniversary of the opening of Grand Central Terminal. To help prepare for the occasion, Metro-North electricians polished and dusted the historic melon chandeliers that illuminate the Terminal, and replaced bulbs as needed. When the chandeliers were installed a century ago, they carried bare, energy-hungry incandescent bulbs. Today they use efficient compact fluorescent bulbs that use just 5 watts to provide the same amount of light as the previous 25-watt bulbs. Each chandelier holds 110 light bulbs.

Photo Credit: MTA Flickr

This is science fiction architecture, in our own time!

via sciencecenter:

Amazing technology would allow for underground parks in NYC

If you’ve been to Manhattan ever, you’ll also know that space is at a premium, and there are few open spaces left to grow leafy green things or build a park. Dubbed the LowLine, the project would convert an old underground trolley car station, abandoned in 1948 and untouched since, into a 1.5 acre underground park. But how? This is where the science comes in: they’ve developed the technology to transmit sunlight underground. Using large parabolic mirrors and a fiber optic relay, sunlight from the surface would be shuttled to the park and then redisbursed, allegedly yielding enough light for photosynthesis. As shown in the artist’s renderings above, the park could house trees, grass, farmers markets, or art installations, all year round, rain or shine.

TWA terminal at JFK airport

TWA terminal at JFK airport

Skyscrapers of the Dead?
via laphamsquarterly:

In 1820 a little-known architect named Thomas Wilson proposed a plan for “a metropolitan cemetery on a scale commensurate with the necessities of the largest city in the world, embracing prospectively the demands of centuries, sufficiently capacious to receive five million of the dead, where they may repose in perfect security, without interfering with the comfort, the health, the business, the property, or the pursuits of the living.” What he proposed, in short, was a massive pyramid, its base covering eighteen acres and its height well above that of St. Peter’s Cathedral—a metropolitan sepulcher, a skyscraper for the dead. —From Colin Dickey’s new Roundtable post, “Skyscrapers of the Dead.” His essay, “Necropolis,” on cemeteries and urban spaces, is featured in our Fall 2010 issue on The City. 

Skyscrapers of the Dead?

via laphamsquarterly:

In 1820 a little-known architect named Thomas Wilson proposed a plan for “a metropolitan cemetery on a scale commensurate with the necessities of the largest city in the world, embracing prospectively the demands of centuries, sufficiently capacious to receive five million of the dead, where they may repose in perfect security, without interfering with the comfort, the health, the business, the property, or the pursuits of the living.” What he proposed, in short, was a massive pyramid, its base covering eighteen acres and its height well above that of St. Peter’s Cathedral—a metropolitan sepulcher, a skyscraper for the dead.

—From Colin Dickey’s new Roundtable post, “Skyscrapers of the Dead.” His essay, “Necropolis,” on cemeteries and urban spaces, is featured in our Fall 2010 issue on The City.