Posts tagged data

Though the average Facebook user may not view her profile as art, Harvard Berkman Center fellow Judith Donath places the “data portrait” in an art-historical context in her forthcoming book, The Social Machine. Whereas medieval portraits signaled the subject’s status through symbols and poses, in the Information Age, portraiture often arises from recordings and data.
Maureen O’Conner, in her essay “Heartbreak and the Quantified Selfie”.

The 2012–13 TV Season in One (Depressing) Chart

While the data doesn’t include DVR viewing (although Nielsen data usually does), this chart helps explain the challenges for Broadcast TV going into the new TV season

How to Hack Your Way to True Love…
via futurejournalismproject:

Brain Pickings features the story of Amy Webb, a journalist and digital strategist who, after a series of bad dates and heartbreak, turned to data to figure out just what she wants in a man, and reverse-engineered a profile that would attract the type of man she was looking for.

This allowed her to create a “super profile,” her very own custom “algorithm” of love. Once she looked at her data and set up a real profile for herself, it was a matter of time until she met Brian, fell in love, got married, and started a family — your ordinary happily-ever-after fairy tale ending, with an extraordinary side of quantitative and qualitative magic. Read on.

She wrote a book about it all: see here.And a gave a TED Talk: see here.
Image: Cover of Webb’s book.

How to Hack Your Way to True Love…

via futurejournalismproject:

Brain Pickings features the story of Amy Webb, a journalist and digital strategist who, after a series of bad dates and heartbreak, turned to data to figure out just what she wants in a man, and reverse-engineered a profile that would attract the type of man she was looking for.

This allowed her to create a “super profile,” her very own custom “algorithm” of love. Once she looked at her data and set up a real profile for herself, it was a matter of time until she met Brian, fell in love, got married, and started a family — your ordinary happily-ever-after fairy tale ending, with an extraordinary side of quantitative and qualitative magic. Read on.

She wrote a book about it all: see here.
And a gave a TED Talk: see here.

Image: Cover of Webb’s book.

Nielsen looked at viewership and advertising across five traditional primetime genres and found that dramas account for the largest share of viewership, timeshifting and ad spend, while reality programs claimed the largest share of product placements.

Nielsen looked at viewership and advertising across five traditional primetime genres and found that dramas account for the largest share of viewership, timeshifting and ad spend, while reality programs claimed the largest share of product placements.

3 Years of Movie-Watching Data

Great example of using personal data to learn more about yourself self.  Also a good example of another film lover cutting the cord.

via ksen:

Larger view

—-

Notes:

Total number of movies watched

2009 = 295

2010 = 365

2011 = 226

I watch a lot of movies on my iPod and Hulu while at work (a lot of my job is collecting data and I need to keep my mind occupied through podcasts and film).

Matt and I no longer own a TV and…

via futurejournalismproject:

US Teens Triple Their Mobile Data Usage
Via Nielsen:

Teens have officially joined the mobile Data Tsunami, more than tripling mobile data consumption in the past year while maintaining their stronghold as the leading message senders. Using recent data from monthly cell phone bills of 65,000+ mobile subscribers who volunteered to participate in the research, Nielsen analyzed mobile usage trends among teens in the United States. In the third quarter of 2011, teens age 13-17 used an average of 320 MB of data per month on their phones, increasing 256 percent over last year and growing at a rate faster than any other age group.  Much of this activity is driven by teen males, who took in 382 MB per month while females used 266 MB.

Note though that twenty and thirty-somethings still rule data usage.
Image: Monthly Data Usage by Age, Q3 2010 v Q3 2011, via Nielsen.
H/T: Mashable.

via futurejournalismproject:

US Teens Triple Their Mobile Data Usage

Via Nielsen:

Teens have officially joined the mobile Data Tsunami, more than tripling mobile data consumption in the past year while maintaining their stronghold as the leading message senders. Using recent data from monthly cell phone bills of 65,000+ mobile subscribers who volunteered to participate in the research, Nielsen analyzed mobile usage trends among teens in the United States. In the third quarter of 2011, teens age 13-17 used an average of 320 MB of data per month on their phones, increasing 256 percent over last year and growing at a rate faster than any other age group.  Much of this activity is driven by teen males, who took in 382 MB per month while females used 266 MB.

Note though that twenty and thirty-somethings still rule data usage.

Image: Monthly Data Usage by Age, Q3 2010 v Q3 2011, via Nielsen.

H/T: Mashable.

Because an idea is just your opinion without the data to back it up…  Looking forward to business schools taking the plunge into big data, as the biggest business opportunities over the next decade are making sense of this data.
via smarterplanet:

Business Schools Plan Leap Into Data - WSJ.com
Faced with an increasing stream of data from the Web and other electronic sources, many companies are seeking managers who can make sense of the numbers through the growing practice of data analytics, also known as business intelligence. Finding qualified candidates has proven difficult, but business schools hope to fill the talent gap.
This fall several schools, including Fordham University’s Graduate School of Business and Indiana University’s Kelley School of Business, are unveiling analytics electives, certificates and degree programs; other courses and programs were launched in the previous school year.
International Business Machines Corp., which has invested more than $14 billion buying analytics industry companies such as Coremetrics and Netezza Corp. since 2005, has teamed up with more than 200 schools, including Fordham, to develop analytics curriculum and training.
“The more students that graduate knowledgeable in areas we care about, the better it is not just for our company but the companies we work with,” said Steve Mills, IBM senior vice president and group executive of software and systems. “It really comes down to what clients and customers need most.”
Data analytics was once considered the purview of math, science and information-technology specialists. Now barraged with data from the Web and other sources, companies want employees who can both sift through the information and help solve business problems or strategize. For example, luxury fashion company Elie Tahari Ltd. uses analytics to examine historical buying patterns and predict future clothing purchases. Northeastern pizza chain Papa Gino’s Inc. uses analytics to examine the use of its loyalty program and has succeeded in boosting the average customer’s online order size.

Because an idea is just your opinion without the data to back it up…  Looking forward to business schools taking the plunge into big data, as the biggest business opportunities over the next decade are making sense of this data.

via smarterplanet:

Business Schools Plan Leap Into Data - WSJ.com

Faced with an increasing stream of data from the Web and other electronic sources, many companies are seeking managers who can make sense of the numbers through the growing practice of data analytics, also known as business intelligence. Finding qualified candidates has proven difficult, but business schools hope to fill the talent gap.

This fall several schools, including Fordham University’s Graduate School of Business and Indiana University’s Kelley School of Business, are unveiling analytics electives, certificates and degree programs; other courses and programs were launched in the previous school year.

International Business Machines Corp., which has invested more than $14 billion buying analytics industry companies such as Coremetrics and Netezza Corp. since 2005, has teamed up with more than 200 schools, including Fordham, to develop analytics curriculum and training.

“The more students that graduate knowledgeable in areas we care about, the better it is not just for our company but the companies we work with,” said Steve Mills, IBM senior vice president and group executive of software and systems. “It really comes down to what clients and customers need most.”

Data analytics was once considered the purview of math, science and information-technology specialists. Now barraged with data from the Web and other sources, companies want employees who can both sift through the information and help solve business problems or strategize. For example, luxury fashion company Elie Tahari Ltd. uses analytics to examine historical buying patterns and predict future clothing purchases. Northeastern pizza chain Papa Gino’s Inc. uses analytics to examine the use of its loyalty program and has succeeded in boosting the average customer’s online order size.

The data may be questionable...

It’s only an idea unless you have the data to back it up; that’s the basic idea behind the scientific method…

Numbers don’t lie, but how they’re framed can change our interpretation of them.
via ilovecharts:

No matter what political ideology you are or what you believe, beware of how easily charts can be manipulated!
-birdmechanical
Always good to remember.

Numbers don’t lie, but how they’re framed can change our interpretation of them.

via ilovecharts:

No matter what political ideology you are or what you believe, beware of how easily charts can be manipulated!

-birdmechanical

Always good to remember.

Could You Capture All Data Everywhere to Predict Everything?

via futurejournalismproject:

Somewhere, anyone who’s ever read Hitchiker’s Guide to the Galaxy is smiling.

Via the BBC:

It could be one of the most ambitious computer projects ever conceived.

An international group of scientists are aiming to create a simulator that can replicate everything happening on Earth - from global weather patterns and the spread of diseases to international financial transactions or congestion on Milton Keynes’ roads.

Nicknamed the Living Earth Simulator (LES), the project aims to advance the scientific understanding of what is taking place on the planet, encapsulating the human actions that shape societies and the environmental forces that define the physical world…

…But how would such colossal system work?

For a start it would need to be populated by data - lots of it - covering the entire gamut of activity on the planet, says Dr Helbing.

It would also be powered by an assembly of yet-to-be-built supercomputers capable of carrying out number-crunching on a mammoth scale.

Although the hardware has not yet been built, much of the data is already being generated.

We hazard an answer: 42!