Posts tagged measurement

3 Years of Movie-Watching Data

Great example of using personal data to learn more about yourself self.  Also a good example of another film lover cutting the cord.

via ksen:

Larger view

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Notes:

Total number of movies watched

2009 = 295

2010 = 365

2011 = 226

I watch a lot of movies on my iPod and Hulu while at work (a lot of my job is collecting data and I need to keep my mind occupied through podcasts and film).

Matt and I no longer own a TV and…

via nationalpost:


Anyone But Romney: The race by the Republican right to find an ‘ABR’ continuesContenders to Mitt Romney in the republican presidential race have emerged and then faded – support for the former Massachusetts governor one of the few constants in the nomination race.Despite Mr. Romney’s inconstantly high poll rankings, the GOP can’t seem to fully embrace him. The National Post’s graphics team takes a look at the ups and downs of the race so far.

via nationalpost:

Anyone But Romney: The race by the Republican right to find an ‘ABR’ continues
Contenders to Mitt Romney in the republican presidential race have emerged and then faded – support for the former Massachusetts governor one of the few constants in the nomination race.

Despite Mr. Romney’s inconstantly high poll rankings, the GOP can’t seem to fully embrace him. The National Post’s graphics team takes a look at the ups and downs of the race so far.

via futurejournalismproject:

US Teens Triple Their Mobile Data Usage
Via Nielsen:

Teens have officially joined the mobile Data Tsunami, more than tripling mobile data consumption in the past year while maintaining their stronghold as the leading message senders. Using recent data from monthly cell phone bills of 65,000+ mobile subscribers who volunteered to participate in the research, Nielsen analyzed mobile usage trends among teens in the United States. In the third quarter of 2011, teens age 13-17 used an average of 320 MB of data per month on their phones, increasing 256 percent over last year and growing at a rate faster than any other age group.  Much of this activity is driven by teen males, who took in 382 MB per month while females used 266 MB.

Note though that twenty and thirty-somethings still rule data usage.
Image: Monthly Data Usage by Age, Q3 2010 v Q3 2011, via Nielsen.
H/T: Mashable.

via futurejournalismproject:

US Teens Triple Their Mobile Data Usage

Via Nielsen:

Teens have officially joined the mobile Data Tsunami, more than tripling mobile data consumption in the past year while maintaining their stronghold as the leading message senders. Using recent data from monthly cell phone bills of 65,000+ mobile subscribers who volunteered to participate in the research, Nielsen analyzed mobile usage trends among teens in the United States. In the third quarter of 2011, teens age 13-17 used an average of 320 MB of data per month on their phones, increasing 256 percent over last year and growing at a rate faster than any other age group.  Much of this activity is driven by teen males, who took in 382 MB per month while females used 266 MB.

Note though that twenty and thirty-somethings still rule data usage.

Image: Monthly Data Usage by Age, Q3 2010 v Q3 2011, via Nielsen.

H/T: Mashable.

Mapping the local media consumption in the US, c/o Nielsen
via performics:

Love this #Infographic on the “Spotlight on Local Media Behaviors” across the country.

Mapping the local media consumption in the US, c/o Nielsen

via performics:

Love this #Infographic on the “Spotlight on Local Media Behaviors” across the country.

Watch this humorous clip of an employee trying to explain Klout to their boss. While Klout takes on the admirable aim to make online influence measurable, in practical terms it’s not a perfect system and can seem a bit silly at times.

What is Klout? www.whattheklout.com (by poopalley)

Because an idea is just your opinion without the data to back it up…  Looking forward to business schools taking the plunge into big data, as the biggest business opportunities over the next decade are making sense of this data.
via smarterplanet:

Business Schools Plan Leap Into Data - WSJ.com
Faced with an increasing stream of data from the Web and other electronic sources, many companies are seeking managers who can make sense of the numbers through the growing practice of data analytics, also known as business intelligence. Finding qualified candidates has proven difficult, but business schools hope to fill the talent gap.
This fall several schools, including Fordham University’s Graduate School of Business and Indiana University’s Kelley School of Business, are unveiling analytics electives, certificates and degree programs; other courses and programs were launched in the previous school year.
International Business Machines Corp., which has invested more than $14 billion buying analytics industry companies such as Coremetrics and Netezza Corp. since 2005, has teamed up with more than 200 schools, including Fordham, to develop analytics curriculum and training.
“The more students that graduate knowledgeable in areas we care about, the better it is not just for our company but the companies we work with,” said Steve Mills, IBM senior vice president and group executive of software and systems. “It really comes down to what clients and customers need most.”
Data analytics was once considered the purview of math, science and information-technology specialists. Now barraged with data from the Web and other sources, companies want employees who can both sift through the information and help solve business problems or strategize. For example, luxury fashion company Elie Tahari Ltd. uses analytics to examine historical buying patterns and predict future clothing purchases. Northeastern pizza chain Papa Gino’s Inc. uses analytics to examine the use of its loyalty program and has succeeded in boosting the average customer’s online order size.

Because an idea is just your opinion without the data to back it up…  Looking forward to business schools taking the plunge into big data, as the biggest business opportunities over the next decade are making sense of this data.

via smarterplanet:

Business Schools Plan Leap Into Data - WSJ.com

Faced with an increasing stream of data from the Web and other electronic sources, many companies are seeking managers who can make sense of the numbers through the growing practice of data analytics, also known as business intelligence. Finding qualified candidates has proven difficult, but business schools hope to fill the talent gap.

This fall several schools, including Fordham University’s Graduate School of Business and Indiana University’s Kelley School of Business, are unveiling analytics electives, certificates and degree programs; other courses and programs were launched in the previous school year.

International Business Machines Corp., which has invested more than $14 billion buying analytics industry companies such as Coremetrics and Netezza Corp. since 2005, has teamed up with more than 200 schools, including Fordham, to develop analytics curriculum and training.

“The more students that graduate knowledgeable in areas we care about, the better it is not just for our company but the companies we work with,” said Steve Mills, IBM senior vice president and group executive of software and systems. “It really comes down to what clients and customers need most.”

Data analytics was once considered the purview of math, science and information-technology specialists. Now barraged with data from the Web and other sources, companies want employees who can both sift through the information and help solve business problems or strategize. For example, luxury fashion company Elie Tahari Ltd. uses analytics to examine historical buying patterns and predict future clothing purchases. Northeastern pizza chain Papa Gino’s Inc. uses analytics to examine the use of its loyalty program and has succeeded in boosting the average customer’s online order size.

The data may be questionable...

It’s only an idea unless you have the data to back it up; that’s the basic idea behind the scientific method…

Area Man Constantly Mentioning He Doesn't Own A Television

A classic article by The Onion, made all the more relevant as Nielsen reports the first drop of TV households in 20 years.

Disclosure: I’m employed by Nielsen, but ideas shared on this blog are my own. I live in a cord-cutting house, and would be represented among those in the news, but hopefully not like the character in The Onion story…