Posts tagged privacy

While the public is increasingly uncomfortable with the idea of government cameras and Internet snoops recording their daily behavior, there does not appear to be much introspection about routinely monitoring people, pets or handymen.
Quentin Hardy, writing in the NYTimes about webcam technology and what surveilance video tech consumers use.
Many are concerned about the NSA listening to their phone calls and reading their email messages. I believe that most should not be very concerned because most are not sending email to intelligence targets. Email that isn’t related to intelligence is rarely viewed, and it’s even less often viewed if it’s from a US citizen. Every Agency employee goes through orientation, in which we are taught about the federal laws that govern NSA/US Cyber Command: Title 10 and Title 50. We all know that it’s illegal to look at a US citizen’s data without a court order.
Former NSA employee Loren Sands-Ramshaw, explaining his perspective as a former NSA agent on his blog.
Varying opinions on internet privacy.

Varying opinions on internet privacy.

Surfacing some potential privacy concerns in Facebook’s new Graph search, via actualfacebookgraphsearches:

“Spouses of married people who like [cheat-on-your-partner dating site] Ashley Madison”

Surfacing some potential privacy concerns in Facebook’s new Graph search, via actualfacebookgraphsearches:

“Spouses of married people who like [cheat-on-your-partner dating site] Ashley Madison”

itswilder:

You’re entire life is online.

This video reveals the magic behind the magic, making people aware of the fact that their entire life can be found online. And by doing so urging everybody to be vigilant. 

Matt Galligan: Facebook Just Ruined Your Address Book

via mattgalligan:

Continuing with my series on User Experience, I’d like to point out an absolutely epic failure. So let me start this one off with a question:

What in God’s name was Facebook thinking when they defaulted everyone’s publicly facing email address to their @facebook.com address?

Image…

ADmented Reality - Google Glasses Remixed with Google Ads (by rebelliouspixels)

via cnnmoneytech:

Laurie & I posted the Facebook deep dive we’ve been working on: A look at what data now shows up in Ticker & Timeline and at how to get your apps to quit transmitting that info.  
With that finished, I went back into my Facebook Privacy Settings to turn off all the sharing I’d enabled for research. I opened all my apps and looked at what data they gather, what they share and where. It’s a little eye-popping in some cases just how much information they reserve the right to grab.
But I also spotted an option I hadn’t seen before: “Last data access.” It’s an unobtrusive little text link in the app settings, but if you click “See details,” it will show you exactly what data the app in question has sucked in and when.
So I tried it for the Washington Post’s app — and found it dragged in pretty much everything it could get its hands on, from basic info like my current city (newspapers want to know where their readers are) to more sensitive details like my relationship status, family members and “religious and political views” (which are blank on Facebook. If it wants to know those, it ought to at least buy me a drink first.) 
The Washington Post settings aren’t unusual; most of my apps had accessed similar amounts of data. 
Go check yours. You might be surprised. Home -> Privacy Settings -> Apps and Websites -> Apps you use -> [pick an app] Edit -> Last data access: See details. -Stacy

via cnnmoneytech:

Laurie & I posted the Facebook deep dive we’ve been working on: A look at what data now shows up in Ticker & Timeline and at how to get your apps to quit transmitting that info.  

With that finished, I went back into my Facebook Privacy Settings to turn off all the sharing I’d enabled for research. I opened all my apps and looked at what data they gather, what they share and where. It’s a little eye-popping in some cases just how much information they reserve the right to grab.

But I also spotted an option I hadn’t seen before: “Last data access.” It’s an unobtrusive little text link in the app settings, but if you click “See details,” it will show you exactly what data the app in question has sucked in and when.

So I tried it for the Washington Post’s app — and found it dragged in pretty much everything it could get its hands on, from basic info like my current city (newspapers want to know where their readers are) to more sensitive details like my relationship status, family members and “religious and political views” (which are blank on Facebook. If it wants to know those, it ought to at least buy me a drink first.) 

The Washington Post settings aren’t unusual; most of my apps had accessed similar amounts of data. 

Go check yours. You might be surprised. Home -> Privacy Settings -> Apps and Websites -> Apps you use -> [pick an app] Edit -> Last data access: See details. -Stacy

A handy venn diagram for politicians using social media, inspired by the Anthony Weiner saga:
kryanjones:

Will they ever learn?

…and a brief reminder about Privacy and social media for the rest of us (from my blog).

A handy venn diagram for politicians using social media, inspired by the Anthony Weiner saga:

kryanjones:

Will they ever learn?

…and a brief reminder about Privacy and social media for the rest of us (from my blog).