Posts tagged retro

NYC is invaded by pixel-art characters in this animated short.

Trying out my own ideas on iOS7, designed to look like a Retro PDA, using this nifty tool to design your own iOS7 UI.

Trying out my own ideas on iOS7, designed to look like a Retro PDA, using this nifty tool to design your own iOS7 UI.

Closing out two weeks of blog posts about beer advertising during Advertising Week on brewnoob's blog:

Fred and Barney for Busch Beer (by ToonORama)

The Evolution of 8-Bit Art (by PBSoffbook)

Andy Kaufman: Godfather of the Trolls

The Kaufman Lawler Feud: Chapter 1 - Andy Fights Women (by popculturestu)

Skyscrapers of the Dead?
via laphamsquarterly:

In 1820 a little-known architect named Thomas Wilson proposed a plan for “a metropolitan cemetery on a scale commensurate with the necessities of the largest city in the world, embracing prospectively the demands of centuries, sufficiently capacious to receive five million of the dead, where they may repose in perfect security, without interfering with the comfort, the health, the business, the property, or the pursuits of the living.” What he proposed, in short, was a massive pyramid, its base covering eighteen acres and its height well above that of St. Peter’s Cathedral—a metropolitan sepulcher, a skyscraper for the dead. —From Colin Dickey’s new Roundtable post, “Skyscrapers of the Dead.” His essay, “Necropolis,” on cemeteries and urban spaces, is featured in our Fall 2010 issue on The City. 

Skyscrapers of the Dead?

via laphamsquarterly:

In 1820 a little-known architect named Thomas Wilson proposed a plan for “a metropolitan cemetery on a scale commensurate with the necessities of the largest city in the world, embracing prospectively the demands of centuries, sufficiently capacious to receive five million of the dead, where they may repose in perfect security, without interfering with the comfort, the health, the business, the property, or the pursuits of the living.” What he proposed, in short, was a massive pyramid, its base covering eighteen acres and its height well above that of St. Peter’s Cathedral—a metropolitan sepulcher, a skyscraper for the dead.

—From Colin Dickey’s new Roundtable post, “Skyscrapers of the Dead.” His essay, “Necropolis,” on cemeteries and urban spaces, is featured in our Fall 2010 issue on The City. 

Introducing Candy Candido with Ted Fio Rita & His Orchestra, performing a song about falling in love with the wrong kind of man.

RT @WVgrrl Impressive data visualization used in the census (you’ll be shocked to learn its from 140 years ago).  Racially insensitive terminology aside, its amazing to think of how older demographers took on many of the same challenges through remarkably modern designs.

RT @WVgrrl Impressive data visualization used in the census (you’ll be shocked to learn its from 140 years ago).  Racially insensitive terminology aside, its amazing to think of how older demographers took on many of the same challenges through remarkably modern designs.